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Lefkippus
I have said before that I believe that the calendar and films are very effective at getting across your message. It is an important message, and one that should continue to be pushed, as there are many obstacles in the UK and around the world to tolerance and inclusion. The relaxed confident messages that the rowers display should encourage guys, sportsmen and otherwise, to be as relaxed and confident about their own bodies, and nakedness in general.
So I mention a related topic for discussion. I do this tentatively as I feel it is important not to allow the message to be diluted. I am an oncologist and I specialise in caring for men who develop testicular cancer. This generally affects men older than members of a student rowing team. And the good news is that these days we cure most men, no matter at what stage they present. However it is better to present early, and this is why campaigns aimed at raising awareness often centre around sports clubs etc. Young men in the UK are renown for having the mindset that they are 'invulnerable'. Such diseases do not happen to them, and they often think going to the GP shows weakness perhaps, or maybe it is fear of finding out what is going on. A state of denial. (In the UK roughly 1 in 300 men will develop testicular cancer during their life-times. If you think how many male students there are at Warwick University, you realise that this is not a small number.)
Whatever the reason, it is important to get across awareness of your testicles, the importance of self-examination and of presenting earlier rather later. You were looking for ideas on where to take this project in the future, and I wonder if there is something here that could be included.
But also importantly on the subject of awareness. I am often very surprised about how little is understood in this country (I trained in South Africa) regarding phimosis. Many young men do not realise that they have this condition. It is usually very treatable, and this need not involve surgery. But no-one has ever explained to them that an over-tight foreskin is not normal, makes cleaning more difficult, and reduces sensation and thus satisfaction, during sex.
Having put forward these ideas, I am not sure how I am suggesting these themes could be developed. But it is clear from this forum that your supporters are very aware of the men in the images, and do not just have 'sports inclusion' on their minds. 
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PVogt
I’d like to say that I feel Lefkippus has a great idea. I am a Physician Assistant in the US ( many of you may not know much about that. I went to a medical school but my degree was as a PA). I am a primary care health care provider and twice over my years I’ve picked up testicular cancer on young guys. It tends to affect young men generally from early 20s up to early-mid 30s. It’s a great idea to partner testicular cancer awareness with the nude Warwick rowers! Perfect opportunity to bring a second “awareness” into the program ! 
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bejjinks
I would say that the difficulty is not that going to the doctor is seen as weak. I would say the difficulty is that our culture still has significant traces of Victorian morality that said, "Don't even talk about it." Men who would go to the doctor for muscle, bone or heart problems are conditioned to be extremely uncomfortable even mentioning possible testicular problems. The strange thing about Victorian morality is that it is more taboo to talk honestly about sex than it is to have sex. They could engage in almost any sexual activity as long as they kept it all hush, hush, don't talk about it. 
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Lefkippus
Yes I think you are right. Which is perhaps why we should be doing more to counter it.
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Lefkippus
I am grateful for the comments from PVogt too, but would like to point out that in this country at least, testicular cancer is a disease of men in their prime. The average age being between 35 and 45.
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PVogt
That IS a difference Lefkippus... wow.   Yeah I've seen a 19 yo have it and I've never seen it in 40's (not to say it doesn't happen).   The two guys  I personally found it were 24 and 31. I wouldn't have expected  that big a difference in age range country to country.   One reason I thought your idea was a  great one is because the rowers would fall into the category as 20's guys which is timely and appropriate but...in the  UK if it doesn't strike until you're a bit older..well then that's the way it is.  IN response to bejjinks that is one way to look at it. Being in primary care myself I have found over the last 20 something years since Viagra was introduced , that men are not nearly embarassed as we thought they'd be, to talk about problems "down there".  I think WE are more open to talk about our testicles than we ever were which is a good thing. Though in the UK,  testicular cancer tends to strike a bit later, I think it would still be appropriate if one of the boys  agreed to do a 30 second spot about a young man checking his testicles for lumps every so often. It can't harm anything for a young man to check himself down there and it would still bring awareness and I think , make the rowers look pretty darn smart and forward thinking.   
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Lefkippus
The common forms of testicular cancer can occur at any age post-puberty. The youngest in our practice is 16, the oldest 83. The average age, the median and the modal are however, all between 35 and 45
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bejjinks
@PVogt, yes the Victorian morality is a century old and fading out but it isn't completely gone. Men are less embarrassed than they used to be but even among twenty year olds I've noticed this reluctance to talk HONESTLY. Of course the guys brag about their sexual prowess but talk about something like phimosis and they clam up.
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